TRCNC: Translational Research on Child Neglect Consortium

What is the Translational Research on Child Neglect Consortium (TRCNC)?

The Translational Research on Child Neglect Consortium (TRCNC) was awarded a grant to continue the preliminary effort created by federal program staff to bring disparate fields together to tackle the public health issue of child neglect by advancing translational science as part of the Federal Child Neglect Research Consortium.  Through this next generation of research collaborations, participants at the TRCNC meeting will include members of the original Federal Child Neglect Research Consortium, invited guest speakers, federal partners, diverse postdoctoral fellows, early career faculty and interested community partners. 

The goals of the annual TRCNC meetings are to:

  • serve as a catalyst for continued innovation in research on child neglect;
  • provide special mentoring opportunities for postdoctoral fellows and members from underrepresented groups (including women and racial/ethnic minorities) as well as opportunities for new investigators to attend the annual meetings and develop strong research career trajectories in research on child neglect;
  • stimulate the exchange of ideas and research findings, permitting cross-fertilization among researchers from different disciplines to decrease the well-documented risk for adverse mental and physical health outcomes and impairments affecting large numbers of neglected children and families across the developmental life span;
  • facilitate community outreach through dissemination activities including webcasts of invited speaker presentations and through community collaborations at local, state, and federal levels (where possible) to foster dissemination of research findings and translate science to "real world" settings

 

ACYF Neuroscience and Child Maltreatment
May 2012 Meeting

National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Neuroscience Center Building
Rockville, Maryland

******

TRCN Consortium Announcements

CSR’s Early Career Reviewer Program Seeks More Participants

CSR is expanding the recruitment of up-and-coming researchers into its new Early Career Reviewer (ECR) program, which was publicized in the September Peer Review Notes last year. We developed the ECR program to (1) train established scientists without prior review experience to become excellent reviewers, (2) give these scientists an experience that will make them more competitive applicants and (3) engage emerging scientists with specific expertise needed by our study sections. “The initial response has been tremendous,” said CSR Acting Director Dr. Richard Nakamura, “I’m happy to say we received almost 1,000 nominations, and about 50 percent of CSR study sections included an ECR in the last review round.” “While the program was specifically designed to recruit qualified ECRs from less research-intensive institutions, we have opened the program to any qualified applicant—with a special emphasis on diversifying institutions NIH draws reviewers from.”

NOTE: We will assist in connecting those applicants who have been accepted with realestate agents and local movers. For instance, if you were moving from or to Baltimore our Baltimore movers list includes only the top companies such as Von Paris Moving & Storage. And although this company is based in the Baltimore area, they also handle national and international moves. Von Paris takes the guesswork out of how much any move by providing a written moving estimate for all moving services.For an additional fee they will also provide a full service packing option and cost estimate to pack everything in your home into large and small moving boxes as well as label and inventory all carrier-packed moving boxes based on the designated room placement in the new location. For international moves from the Baltimore area, Von Paris International not only provides specialized international packing, wrapping, crating and containerization of all household goods, but also will take care of the many other details associated with an international relocation. Likewise, we have a list of recommended professionals in most of the major cities in the US and Canada, along with Europe. Don't hesitate to contact us if you need help.

What is expected? ECRs will participate in a CSR study section meeting once a year for up to two years, serving as the third reviewer on two to four NIH grant applications each time. This lighter review load will help ECRs stay focused on advancing their research careers.

What are the requirements? We are looking for researchers who have an active, independent research program, who are published in peer reviewed research journals, and who have not reviewed for CSR in a face-to-face meeting. An ECR does not necessarily need to have NIH or equivalent funding.

 

Announcement for the National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect: Summer Research Institute - June 13-17th 2011

NDACAN will sponsor its 19th Summer Research Institute (SRI) for child maltreatment researchers on the Cornell University campus in Ithaca, New York on June 13-17th, 2011. The Institute will be an intensive experience in secondary data analysis that combines colloquia with hands-on computing time. Participants are selected on a competitive basis from a variety of disciplines including psychology, social work, and medicine. The primary goal of the Institute is to facilitate secondary analysis projects from which researchers can publish their findings.

Applications must be received on or before January 28th, 2011. For more information,

 

Announcing Doris Duke Fellowships for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect

The Doris Duke Charitable Foundation is very excited to announce the creation of the Doris Duke Fellowships for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect which will be developed and managed by Chapin Hall Center for Children. For more information, Click Here.

 

2007 Young Scholar Receives Award for Dissertation on Child Maltreatment

2007 Young Scholar TISHA WILEY, a doctoral student in Psychology at the University of Illinois, Chicago, received the Division 37 Section on Child Maltreatment Dissertation Award for her doctoral dissertation entitled: "The Effects of Child Maltreatment and Environmental Stability on Children's Trajectories of Aggressive Behavior." This project investigates both independent and interactive effects of childhood maltreatment considering environmental stability on children's aggressive behaviors over a period of time. For more information about this award and Ms. Wiley's dissertation, click here to view the Division 37 Fall 2008 Newsletter.

 

CDC Releases Study on Abuse & Neglect of Infants

CDC released a study entitled "Nonfatal Maltreatment of Infants -- United States, October 2005–September 2006." The study, published in CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, found that in the year studied, there were 91,278 babies less than 1 year old who were documented victims of child abuse or neglect. Of those, 29,881 were victims of abuse or neglect before they were 1 week old.
    Almost 70% of babies less than 1 week old were reported for neglect and 13.2% were reported for physical abuse. The study also found that medical professionals, such as doctors, nurses, and other hospital staff were most likely to report child abuse and neglect of babies.

The study was authored by researchers from CDC's National Center for Injury Prevention & Control and the Administration for Children & Families (ACF).

Child maltreatment is a huge problem throughout the United States, and it disproportionately affects the youngest members of our society. The few cases of abuse or neglect we see in the news are only a small part of the problem. Many cases are not reported to police or social services. What we do know is that approximately 1,530 children died in the United States in 2006 from abuse and neglect. In addition, the legal and health care costs for child maltreatment exceed $24 billion each year.

April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month, an observance intended to increase awareness of child maltreatment and encourage individuals and communities to support children and families. CDC defines child maltreatment as any act or series of acts of commission or omission by a parent or other caregiver that results in harm, potential for harm, or threat of harm to a child. During April, CDC and ACF will highlight a range of child maltreatment prevention measures at the national, state, and local levels, including promotion of safe, stable, and nurturing relationships (SSNR) between children and caregivers.

    More information on child maltreatment and the SSNR framework can be found in the following publications:

The Effects of Childhood Stress on Health Across the Lifespan

Preventing Child Sexual Abuse within Youth Serving Organizations: Getting Started on Policies and Procedures

Child Maltreatment Surveillance, Uniform Definitions for Public Health and Recommended Data Elements

Additional information is also available from the CDC, from ACF, and from the Child Welfare Information Gateway.

New grants awarded by The Children's Bureau

    Programs funded this year include Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect through Nurse Home Visiting Program and the Regional Partnership Grants for Substance Abuse and Child Welfare.

 

******

2012 Annual Meeting Agenda

TRCNC Sixth Annual Meeting
September 20-21, 2012
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Neuroscience Center
Rockville, Maryland

Special New Event: Poster Session & Reception

We are pleased to announce an important addition to the scientific component
of the upcoming 2012 TRCNC meeting. We will be having a POSTER
SESSION and reception on Thursday evening at the Bethesda North Marriott
Hotel and Conference Center. This will be an opportunity to inform the other
participants of your work and to receive feedback. You will also be listed in the
conference program.

If you would like to present your new work on child neglect, please send an
abstract to CS Widom (cwidom@jjay.cuny.edu) describing your poster.

****Abstracts should be submitted by Friday, 31 August to insure that it can be included in the poster session and in the listing in the program agenda.

    
LOCATION:

NIH Neuroscience Center 6001 Executive Blvd Rockville, MD 20852
PLEASE SEND COMPLETED REGISTRATION FORMS TO:
TRCNC c/o Ms. Annabella Bernard
via EMAIL to TRCNC(at)jjay.cuny.edu
or FAX to (212) 484 - 1199

NOTE: Because of grant support from several NIH agencies, we are fortunate not to have to charge a registration fee.

Funding for the Translational Research on Child Neglect Consortium conference is made possible (in part) by Grant # R13 MH07586 from National Institute of Mental Health, NIH, DHHS; with co-funding from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, DHHS; The National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, DHHS; and the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, NIH, DHHS.  The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention by trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

********

National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect
Summer Research Institute
Cornell University, June 8 - 12, 2009

 

NDACAN will sponsor its seventeenth Summer Research Institute for child maltreatment researchers on the Cornell University campus in Ithaca, New York on June 8 - 12, 2009. Conducted annually since 1993, the Summer Research Institute is an intensive experience in secondary data analysis that combines colloquia with hands-on computing time. Participants are selected on a competitive basis from a variety of disciplines including psychology, social work, and medicine. The primary goal of the Institute is to facilitate secondary analysis projects from which researchers can publish their findings. In addition, the Institute provides child maltreatment researchers an invaluable opportunity for networking and collaboration.

OVERVIEW OF INSTITUTE ACTIVITIES

    Using data from the Archive holdings, applicants develop research questions and describe their projects in their applications. Accepted applicants obtain their datasets prior to arriving at the Institute so that they can familiarize themselves with the data and conduct preliminary analyses. While at the Institute, participants have the opportunity to work intensively with the data. Consultants and other participants are available to provide technical support and to assist with statistical analysis issues. In addition to the computing sessions, participants attend a lecture each day that addresses statistical and research issues relevant to the group.

SCHEDULE AND ACCOMMODATIONS

    The Institute will begin on Monday evening (6/8) with an opening orientation/dinner and will conclude after lunch on Friday (6/12). Participants are encouraged to stay throughout the entire Institute. Computing sessions will be held Monday through Friday with afternoon lectures Tuesday through Thursday. Participants will stay in private rooms at the Cornell University Statler Hotel. The hotel room cost and most meals will be covered by the Archive, but participants are responsible for their travel expenses and hotel incidentals.

DIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS

    NDACAN is offering three scholarships to cover the travel fares for two minority participants and one graduate student. It is hoped that these scholarships will promote a diverse array of applicants who would otherwise be unable to attend the Institute.

SELECTION OF PARTICIPANTS

Applicants are rated based on the quality of their proposal, their research background, and the intention to publish their findings. The Archive will give preference to researchers who have obtained their intended dataset from our holdings prior to applying to the Institute. Faculty, post-docs, advanced graduate students, and research professionals are encouraged to apply. Applicants who were not accepted in a previous year may reapply.

Applications must be received on or before January 30, 2009. Applicants will be notified of acceptance status in February.

******

Summer Research Institute, Cornell University, June 8 - 12, 2009

The Summer Research Institute promotes the use of Archive datasets and encourages publication of research findings. At the Institute, participants gain greater familiarity with the datasets they are using and make progress on their research projects. Participants work during daily computing sessions, obtain assistance from consultants and colleagues, and attend relevant colloquia. The Institute will begin on Monday evening (6/8) with an opening orientation/dinner and will conclude after lunch on Friday (6/12).

The Archive encourages applications from advanced graduate students, post-docs, faculty, and other researchers. Applicants are rated based on the quality of their proposal, their research background, and the intention to publish their findings. In addition to these criteria, applicants are selected in order to achieve some balance of datasets being represented. The Archive will give preference to researchers who have obtained and examined their in! tended dataset from our holdings prior to applying to the Institute.

Instructions: Applications must include a recent CV and provide answers to the questions below. Please type or paste your responses directly into the boxes. The application and CV must be sent via e-mail attachment to NDACAN@cornell.edu. Please title your attachments with your last name (e.g. JonesApp.doc, JonesCV.doc).

 

DEADLINE: Applications and CVs must be received via e-mail attachment on or before Friday January 30, 2009.

TRCNConsortium.com